“Third World as Retirement Home”>>These Negros


These negros are talking about shipping
the elderly from the Global north (First world
north) to the Global south (Third world south)?

So you mean to tell me, rather than deal
with humans where they are, to provide them with
health care after they have worked, had children,
paid taxes, fought in wars, they will be
shipped somewhere else because it “makes
more sense.” This is profound.

This is another example of the ways in
which the lives of the folks of the Third
World South, subsidize the lives of the folks in
the First World North.

One somewhat daring approach ? would be to encourage a reverse flow of older immigrants from developed to developing countries. If older residents of developed countries took their retirements along the southern coast of the Mediterranean or in Latin America or Africa, it would greatly reduce the strain on their home countries? public entitlement systems. The developing countries involved, meanwhile, would benefit because caring for the elderly and providing retirement and leisure services is highly labor intensive. Relocating a portion of these activities to developing countries would provide employment and valuable training to the young, growing populations of the Second and Third Worlds.

The audacity of creating, in 2010 and beyond an
entire country of underpaid Negro, Asian and Latino
nurses and servants is incredible.

In some ways, this IS the manifestation
of a world separated into two groups,
the Elite and the people who serve them.

Brazil is this way, and California and New York
City are moving towards it.

As I always say, where will people go and
what will they eat?

We are all connected.

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Comments

  1. manaen says

    A recurring theme:
    .
    Some 20 years ago, Japan’s Prime Minister experienced an angry backlash to his comment that elderly people in his country head on down to Thailand or some such inexpensive place to retire.
    .
    In our country, Colorado’s Governor Richard Lamm ignited a similar reaction in 1984 with his statement that “We’ve got a duty to die and get out of the way with all of our machines and artificial hearts and everything else like that and let the other society, our kids, build a reasonable life.” This was widely reported as that he said that the *elderly* have a duty to die and get out of the way.
    (http://www.nytimes.com/1984/03/29/us/gov-lamm-asserts-elderly-if-very-ill-have-duty-to-die.html)

  2. Kijoro says

    I’m an English teacher for immigrants and refugees. A few weeks ago we were discussing ideas of racial and cultural identity. I asked what it means to be Mexican, Polish, Sudanese, or Chinese and if that is different in Chicago than their place of origin.
    One Mexican woman nearly jumped out of her seat exclaiming, “No! The American people come to my home to retire. They buy a big house on the beach and hire people to clean and cook. In Chicago, I work for them. I go home to Mexico, and I work for them. Wherever I am, I am the worker. I am not the one who retires.”
    Her comments really startled me, but come to think of it, I saw a similar story in China and growing up in Korea as a military kid. The world is our hired help. I asked the class why that was, and it led us to a month-long discussion of capitalism and the education to make financial choices.
    What’s interesting is that, in the end, none of the class really minded that this happens, they were just upset that THEY weren’t be the ones retiring. They just want to be the ones with the financial power, too.

  3. admin says

    Kijoro!
    Thank you for commenting.
    Girrrrrrrrrrrrrl. Let me tell you.

    What?s interesting is that, in the end, none of the class really minded that this happens, they were just upset that THEY weren?t be the ones retiring. They just want to be the ones with the financial power, too.
    ======
    Two weeks ago, we read, probably what is one of my favorite books this year, which is Servants of Globalization
    by Rachel Parrenas
    which looks at Fillipina domestic workers in Rome and Los Angelos.

    The MOST profound take aways from the book are:
    *Many of these women have higher education, and worked as accountants admins in the Philippines, but they make MORE money as domestic workers abroad so that just take the L.
    *Many of the women work as domestic workers abroad while simultaneously, employing maids at home for their parents and GET THIS, are waiting to return home so that THEY can afford maids. <<<<<< This blew my mind. They literally fantasize, about returning home and having maids.

    Wherever I am, I am the worker. I am not the one who retires.?
    ===========
    Ain't that some shit. Ummm. Ummm. Ummmp.

    That class conversation sounds awesome.
    Being a waitress last summer completly politicized me in a way that I had not expected.

    Thank you for sharing.
    ~Renina