Gotty & NDiamond$. This fa’ Yall.

Hearing this song for the first time in hella long, leads me to conclude that King T was really on some West Coast Premier jawn.

Them scratches were nasteeeee.

My King T inspiration is brought to you by the fam over @ SS, which has been kinda fuegocito for the last few days.

Back to King T.
I remember my brother usta STAY playing the King T w/ tht orange casette w/ the stripes.

So.

I figgerd I would show love and add on my two.

Dude.

Cube w/ a curl in music video posing as a judge.

Priceless.

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Ummmm Sunday night blog post.
Delicious!

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Don’t Make Friends with Writers or Good Morning Video Vixen!


One of the downsides of being my friend is that I will blog about you. Especially if something funny happens. My girl s.bot (who likes gurrrls), saw, I Think I Love my Wife recently. She cracked me the fuck up w/ her comments.

S: Yo. You seen that new Chris Rock.

TT: Nah. I know you wanna see it. Kerry Washington is Bad. You allready told me you saw it and that you wanna see it again.

S: Dude. That movie is my life.

TT: What?!?!?!?!

S: Dude, Me and *Ayana have been together mad long, its like we are married. I be out, and video vixens role up on me and next thing I know I wake in the morn with a big booty in my bed and I ain’t going to work that day.

TT: Whaaaaat!!?!?!?! Gurl. You crazy. When the last time you woke up w/ a big booty next to you? (Hellla loling).

S: Naw. You know. I would have told you.

TT: You this sh*t is mad funny. Imma blog about it. Im surries.

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Up date:

That dude that ain’t want me to call him a n*gga. His lil scan’less @ss came back trynna pop up.

LOL.

He had the nerve to try and send me a message as if our prior exchange didn’t even occur. Yall know I am not passive agressive in my personal life. I do enough of that professionaly @ school & work. N*ggas. I was like “ain’t chu DEAD me” because of my language.

Him: I like you.

Me: You don’t know me. You saw a flick and an e-mail exchange.

See. Fellas. I have a real sensitive aspergers antenna.

Why would openly SIGN UP for dealing w/ someone that is slow on the uptake(passive agressive) and trying to dead me b/c of my language when I am fast in the mouth, ass, mind and spirit.

Im mean really.

Its spring agaiiiiiin.

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Dude. I heard a song from Return of the Boom Bap.

I needs to get that sh*t again. Its magically delicious.

How yall doing?

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Who Knew That Rebecca and Alice Walker had So Much Funk?

Rarely do we ever hear about black families, namely mommas and daughters working through the kind of funk that we experience with our mommas.

As someone who has had a tulmultous realtionship with my mother (I love her BUT she crazy ‘yall), I felt Rebecca when she was comfortably ambilivent about being on speaking terms w/ her momma.

She was both optimistic and unsure about what she was going to do when her son wanted to meet his grandmother. With Bill Cosby going on all of his Black parenting rants, I realize that there is a lack of public discourse about Black families, and the day to day sh*t that brings cats together and also tears them apart.

What does Jordan’s son have to say about him and their relationship?
Magic Johnson’s children?
What does Cosby’s daughter have to say about theirs?

Maia Cambell, now that her momma just passed?

Danny Glovers Daughter?

Peep what Rebecca has to say in this Times Review of her new book Baby Love,

But it is also unusual in that it is a pregnancy book with a message for women who are not yet pregnant, amplifying a theme Ms. Walker sounds on the undergraduate lecture circuit.

?I keep telling these women in college, ?You need to plan having a baby like you plan your career if it?s something that you want,? ? she said. ?Because we haven?t been told that, this generation. And they?re shocked when I say that. I?m supposed to be like this feminist telling them, ?Go achieve, go achieve.? And I?m sitting there saying, ?For me, having a baby has been the most transformational experience of my life.? ?


It seems to me, from Rebecca’s comment that historically, having a baby HAS not been seen AS an acheivement. And perhaps that is part of the problem itself.

Perhaps, like to our career goals, it needs to be framed as a something to work towards along with something that sorta just “happens”, or someting that we are ambivlent about.

The artiles touches on what happens when your momma is a famous writer.

Ms. Walker?s own evolution, from wounded daughter to earth mother, was perhaps particularly significant because ?she was raised in a more radical zone,? Ms. Baumgardner said.

There is a tradition of feminist writing about pregnancy and motherhood, but not everyone had such a complex mother-daughter dynamic to process.

Alice Walker ?gave to the world this incredible thing,? Ms. Baumgardner said. ?But what you want from your parents is parenting.?

Rebecca and her momma got some of that millenial funk. My sister and my momma funk like that. I think they ain’t spoke since was ’01. All bad.

Ms. Walker and her mother have a complicated love, according to Rebecca. In high school, Rebecca legally changed her last name from Leventhal to Walker because, as she put it in ?Black, White and Jewish,? she wanted to link herself to her mother ?tangibly and forever? and to associate herself with blackness because she does not feel ?an affinity with whiteness, with what Jewishness has become.? (That last sentiment, which is echoed in other parts of the memoir, led several publications to criticize it for reinforcing stereotypes.)

I am curious as to what sterotype was she reinforcing?

Here is Rebecca’s Blog.


In an Essence article from ’95 Rebecca discusses the “Pine Box Incident” in a warm, critical and reflective way,

When I was just 8 years old, my mother had me crawl into bed beside her before asking me to take some dictation. “When I die,” she said as if she were telling me which clothes to lay out for the next day, “make sure I am buried in a simple pine box. And play lots of Stevie Wonder. My funeral should be a celebration!” Dutifully, I began to write–“P-i-n-e b-o-x, S-t-e-v-i-e W-o-n-d-e-r”–on the yellow legal pad she placed on my lap. I don’t remember what I felt then as my mother asked me to prepare for a time when she would no longer be present. Now, after reliving certain childhood moments in an attempt to understand them and myself better, I imagine that I did what I always tried to do for my mama. I tried to be who and what she needed me to be at the time. Instead of asking her all the hideous questions running scared through my child-mind–Mama, are you going to die? Mama, are you leaving me? Mama, who will take care of me? Mama, what about us?–I simply memorized the funeral plan to the letter and cheerfully assured her I would take care of everything.


It reminds me of how OUR stories of pain, love and forgivness are largely missing among the American pop culture canon.


I have heard similar fears from other women whose working mothers had leave them alone for greater parts of the day or night, depending on them to “take care of things”; or who, because of some other circumstance beyond their control, usually abuse or neglect, were unable to get the kind of constant unconditional love that young children crave. Listening to their stories, it becomes clear why individuation is often so difficult for young women. We fear that if we go our own way, off into our destinies outside of our mothers’ desires, we will surely perish. We will die of aloneness.

Rebecca ain’t never lied on that. Between my money being funny and the ice storm, my plans this last weekend were screwed.

I spent 30 hours by myself this weekend.
That was 6pm Saturday to 10 am Monday morning.

While I did talk to people on the phone, there is something to be said for spending THAT much time by youself.

I spend Sunday reading, making evidence flash cards, teaching myself the doctrine of functionality in trademark law.

I would argue that this weekend was part of the individuation process that Rebecca mentioned above.

My Friday night date w/ TL fell apart. I thought I was gonna go to Boston for the Black Law Student conference. But I didn’t register and the ice storm came. I called him on Thursday, he never confirmed w/ me so….that fell apart.

Saturday. No conference.

Sunday. March Madness was poppin and there was a Knicks game, but nobody was trying come outside and play so I kicked it w/ the books.

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Watchall think about this? Ummmmm mommas and daughters.

What ever happend to Lisa Jones, Baraka’s daughter?
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Chip Johnson is an Irresponsible Journalist for the SF Chronicle.



Chip Johnson wrote an article on crime in Oakland that I have major beef with.

He calls himself drawing attention to the lack of police presence in the well heeled neighborhoods and how long it takes for them to respond, in the event that they do.

What he failed to do was realize how biased, dangerous, racist his descriptions of Oakland’s “shadowy characters”.

With Oakland police resources stretched to the limit from the patrol to the investigations divisions, it’s not surprising that citizens all over the city are feeling the pinch in their neighborhoods.

The city’s spike in homicides, which last year reached the highest number in more than a decade, grabbed headlines. But at the same time, residents and business owners across Oakland are finding that they can’t count on officers responding to their calls for help — and their patience is wearing thin.

There has always been a tug-of-war between residents in the city’s hills who clamor for more protection from property crimes and those living in the flatlands areas with the highest violent crime, which is where police recently have been focusing many of their resources.

Now people in both areas are alarmed by rising crime that police don’t seem to be able to handle.

Residents’ experiences run the gamut. A woman on an Adams Point street crowned a would-be burglar with a wine bottle to stop him from entering her Harrison Street home, while a software consultant in tonier Crocker Highlands successfully discouraged a knife-wielding robber last week.

Ken Marcus was walking home from a bus stop when he saw a man who didn’t fit in with the surroundings. Casting the thought off as paranoia, he turned and started to make his way up a steep grade.

How does someone not fit into their surroundings. Was he Black? A crackhead. A d-boy? Was he pusing a buggy? Did he have locks and a white T. This is statement is so irresponsbile as a journalist. So loaded.

But when Marcus turned around, the man he suspected doubled back on him and confronted him, weapon in hand.

With Oakland police resources stretched to the limit from the patrol to the investigations divisions, it’s not surprising that citizens all over the city are feeling the pinch in their neighborhoods.

Implicit in this statement is that crime is reasonable and tolerable in some neighborhoods and forbidden, out of character and intolerable in others. Even while this may be a TRUE, as a journalist you have an obligation and duty to be mindful that you are talking about communities with HUMAN BEINGS, with children and families that live there now, and have been living there for years.


The city’s spike in homicides, which last year reached the highest number in more than a decade, grabbed headlines. But at the same time, residents and business owners across Oakland are finding that they can’t count on officers responding to their calls for help — and their patience is wearing thin.

There has always been a tug-of-war between residents in the city’s hills who clamor for more protection from property crimes and those living in the flatlands areas with the highest violent crime, which is where police recently have been focusing many of their resources.

Now people in both areas are alarmed by rising crime that police don’t seem to be able to handle.

Residents’ experiences run the gamut. A woman on an Adams Point street crowned a would-be burglar with a wine bottle to stop him from entering her Harrison Street home, while a software consultant in tonier Crocker Highlands
successfully discouraged a knife-wielding robber last week.

Ken Marcus was walking home from a bus stop when he saw a man who didn’t fit in with the surroundings. Casting the thought off as paranoia, he turned and started to make his way up a steep grade.

What the f*ck is don’t fit the surroundings. Was he black? Did he have on a hoodie? Was he a crack head? Was he homeless. This is so loaded.

Marcus stepped away from the man and into Santa Ray Avenue as he demanded money.

“Once I got enough distance, I could either run or stand my ground,” Marcus said Monday.

He challenged the man — then threatened him at the top of his lungs and scared him back into a waiting car.

“I wasn’t thinking of my stuff or the $20 in my pocket,” Marcus said. “I was thinking this guy wants to hurt me, maybe kill me. I was afraid for my safety.”

The kicker came later, when Marcus walked home and called police. They showed up 15 minutes later and took a report — and one of them remarked that it was rare to get calls in that neighborhood.

The incident made Marcus wonder if his neighborhood was the newest spot on the bandits’ radar screen after historically having been largely untouched by the city’s crime.

“It’s like Halloween, where kids go into certain neighborhoods to get the good stuff, except now it’s happening with crime,” he said.

Awww. The itty bitty baby is getting a taste of how trill the town is. Unless YOU do something to address the underlying issues, this is only the begining. I hate when people get hella surprised when the calamaties that affect the hood creep into their lives and they have the nerve to be SCARED. Ha.

There have been shootings on Lakeshore Avenue, near Lake Merritt, an the attempted robbery on Santa Ray Avenue, where Mayor Ron Dellums’ mother lived for years, and shootings in Adams Point.

No matter how you slice it, the perception of crime in Oakland, like a bad moon, is rising again. There are unexpected locations for random violence in Oakland, and a barometer reading suggests more rough times ahead.

There are two cases among scores of such crimes in recent months that illustrate the frustration that real, would-be and near-miss victims experience in their dealings with officers who are required to rank the threat level of each service call and respond in an appropriate manner.

Where is the mention of how the police interact w/ the non monied? The article would have been that much better if he would have interviewed some working class folks that live on High Street or Seminary or Fruitvale. You would infer from this article that the police are actually being effective in the flatlands. But naw. If the Lake got crime, then thats what matters.

In the first incident, an unidentified woman who was attacked at Oakland‘s Fruitvale BART Station on Jan. 25 jumped on a train to evade her assailant, rode to Fremont and reported the attack to authorities.

When Oakland police were notified of the incident, they asked Fremont police to take the report because they had no one to send. An attack at a public transit stop is a pretty serious crime, right?

This should be of paramount concern to Dellums and could well define his first term in office. Until a plan to reduce such violence is hatched, the flow of middle-class African Americans from this city will continue. It’s an emigration that has already prompted calls for meetings of the largest black churches in the city, said Bishop Bob Jackson, pastor of Acts Full Gospel Church, one of Oakland‘s largest black churches.

Jackson said losses had been felt in all the city’s big congregations, including his own church, which he estimated had seen more than 300 former members move out of the area because of the growing violence.

Negroes been moving out of the Oakland to Antioch, Atlanta and Vegas for a hot minute now, and it is not about to stop.

Public perception may not accurately reflect the outcomes of the war on crime in Oakland, but it still provides a sense of the general scene. If all that holds true, the city needs to present a plan for shoring up its short-staffed police department and devise some strategy to adequately address serious felony crimes before public confidence falls through the floor.

This statement presumes that public confidence of the Lake dwellers is all that is relevent. What about folks in the lower bottom, 11/5, dog town, etc? I would imagine that the rationale is that “they hood n*ggas anyways, so they use to hella crime”.

Chip Johnson’s column appears on Tuesdays and Fridays. E-mail him at chjohnson@sfchronicle.com.

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That was a fun post.

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I Sold Watuh Last Year or Beyond Beats and Rhymes is Dope.

My top ten favorite moments in the Documentary: Beyond Beats and Rhymes:

1. Seeing Stephen Hill from BET walk away from Byron when asked how he felt about the Black male images on BET.

2. Hearing dude being interviewed on the street say, I SOLD WATUH last summah. WHAT!

3.Seeing dudes grab girls booties and assert that they had a RIGHT to tap-a-@ss at BET’s Spring Bling. All I could think was, these sistas ain’t got guns. (‘yall know I’m violent: Tre ironic hunh? lol).

5. Seeing Jada Kiss ask Byron “What Kinda Movies you Watch?”, when Byron asked Jada about his murked filled lyrics.

6. Where was Greg Tate?

7. Berverly Guy-Sheftall is hella fresh. I been Liked her. But seeing her on camera confirmed the fact that she is my auntie in Atlanta.

8. I love the ITS JUST ENTERTAINMENT DEFENSE. SLICK real slick.

9. Realizing that I know Asha Jennings from Oakland.

10. And Finally. Hearing dudes on the street say, “If you take that rightous rap to the labels, they ain’t trynna hear that”.

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Hip Hop Docs Rock!

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