Why Can’t the Obama’s Send Their Kids to Public School?



Apparently the Obama’s send their daughters to a private school

I find it tre interesting that we are questioning whether?
his daughters should go to private or public school
and what it says about Senator Obama as a leader
when we don’t question the decisions?of our elected leaders,?
school teachers and administrators?to send?not send ?their?
children to the public schools?that they work for.

Chicago schools have been in the news lately.
Last week, in order to bring attention to the inequity in school
and headed to a suburban school district and attempted to?
enroll to shed light on inequitable funding between school
districts.?In New Trier, a suburb, spending tops at $17K per student,
whereas in Chicago, it tops off at $10,400K per student.

In light of this funding discrepancy, why is Senator Obama
expected to send his kids to schools, that teachers,
white Teachers (the majority of public school teachers in this country
are white women) would never send their children to?

I am torn on this. As a product of both public and private institutions
they both have their merits and drawbacks. What I do know, is
that education is expensive, and that until we acknowledge that
nothing will be done and analyze why what stops folks from
acting, nothing meaningful will be done.

I also know that failure creates jobs and that people would?
rather talk about “a culture of poverty” rather than about
how many people pay their mortgages off of jobs related
to the academic failure of low income students.

As parents, we all want to give our children better than what we had.
However, public servants are obligated to serve not only their families
interests but the interests of the public as well.

Perhaps, the question then becomes, where does Obama’s public life
end and his private life began.

Rather than be interested in where the Obama daughters attend school,
perhaps we should be more interested in how inequitable schools are?
funded in Chicago between low income districts and affluence districts.

Providing quality education to all is a benchmark of a healthy democracy.
As a rule, I listen to a persons words, and I also watch their actions.
It is clear that commenter’s are interested “they own”, the rest be damned.
It ain’t blatant neglect, but it is neglect just the same.

Look at the following comments it appears that folks want a better?
educational?system. In the meantime, their children are enrolled?
in Chicago Day?Prep school. No time for fake ones. Check out some?
of the comments?for the Times article,
“Any parent who doesn’t send their child to the school that best
meets their needs is irresponsible”

“I am not a believer in sacrificing my child for the potential- but not
certain- benefit for society”

“Children are not the sacrificial lambs for the greater good. As someone
who attended public school all her life, and managed to get into and?
graduate from The University of Chicago…I would have loved to have
attended the Lab School”.?
What would happen of all the parents of students at underfunded schools
said that they wouldn’t send them there any longer unless they were funded equitably.
Logistically, it would be a nightmare, but it would sure bring attention to the situation.

Black people in this country have a had a real tenuous relationship with?
education. Throughout history, we have always been fighting to learn.
At first it was illegal for us to read. Then we were allowed to read?
but in our sub par schools, just the same, we made do with what we had.
Then the schools were “desegregated”,?but first little Black boys and
girls had to be escorted to schools by?the national guard because racists
where not interested in going to school with them.

Implicit in the spirit of many of the commenter’s messages from the?
quoted above is that the lives of some children are worth more than others.
stated that only 32?percent of Black men enrolled in high school in
New York?graduated on schedule.?Yes. 32 percent. If this is the case in
New York City, then I wonder?what the case is in say, LA, Chicago,?
Baltimore and Philly.

The bottom line is until we treat the education of ALL children the way?
we treat the education of “our” children the 2008 Jim Crow system of?
education?will persist.

As long as we have two educational systems we will have two America’s.

Where is the Democracy in that?

Comments

  1. As a Christian, we send our child to a private school so that she will be allowed to pray in school and learn about Christianity as part of her overall education. If public schools were allowed to offer the same, we would not hesitate to enroll her in a public school.

    I pay so that my child can pray.

  2. serena_love says:

    Michelle Obama used to work at Lab School which is run by the University of Chicago. Because of that they get a deep discount on admission, and Lab is one of the best schools in chicago if not the best. I’m from Hyde Park (right across the street from Obama in fact), if I had the chance to send my kids there you best believe I would. I say that even though I actively make fun of kids who go to Lab. Hi Hater…I know.

  3. I have so many things to say in response.

    Trying to determine whats the most apropo.

  4. I attended public school and after my older bro was murdered, my peoples put me in private school…best thing that ever happened to me. I support Obama…BUT…I’m a fan of school VOUCHERS. Black people and less well-off people in general benefit significantly from the voucher system…better teachers, better educational facilities,…hope.

  5. @ Serena, Sarah & GMllz…

    How exactly are we complicit in the failure of Low Income children (of all ethnicities) if we continue to make DO for OUR biological children and say f-ck the rest, I am sending MINES to private school?

    Vouchers/Private….etc….How will there ever be equity if we continue to say "this is where mine" gonna go to school?

  6. What are you supposed to do? Leave your child in a subpar school because everybody else’s is there? Nah B. Personally, I think Barack is doing the right thing sending his girls to receive a quality education. If it isn’t publicly available in his residential distict and he has the means, then you gotta do what you gotta do. Michelle wouldn’t let it go down any other way anyway…and I feel her.

    Vouchers are the best solution that I see out there. Vouchers reward good teachers and good schools and they will attract parents interested in their child’s education. Weak schools and weak teachers will lose their students if they are unable to adapt and replicate the practices of quality schools. The free market at its best. Schools that attract students will make adjustments to accommodate additional capacity while at the same time other schools will arise that offer an education commensurate with that of the best schools. Thats a perfect scenario of course…and it wouldn’t happen overnight.

    On another note, this country needs a leader that is seeking ACTUAL change. Somehow Americans affected by this inequality need to consolidate and stand up…sh*tttt Americans in general need to be heard from. Real change comes from the bottom up. That’s easier said than done though…as you know visionary. Just my thoughts. Peace.

  7. AMERICAN education is expensive, but learning has always been free. African kids and the like study in huts with no running water, etc and they get EDUCATED. They are disciplined in thought and practice. The are instilled with something called DESIRE which is also free but damn near untapped in American’s psyche. Our schools stink because there is a culture of minimalism that is bread in students and TEACHERS and those things combined have made public education substandard. When a parent makes the decision to seek vouchers or pay for education, they have said that education is important to and for my family which is always a good thing. The bad thing is that there aren’t enough vouchers or scholarships to go around and why the hell do you need a scholarship to get a good education any damn way?!?! But, since THAT is the case, who is going to breathe life and hope and light into the wack ass current education system? How can this be accomplished? When will parents of the underprivileged unite on some real “Rise up” shit? I mean damn, if everything is cyclical, then we are due for a resurgence in upstanding thought and action in relation to family and education in the hood any day now. Which is exactly why I work in Education.

  8. I’m glad you explored this topic because it’s one that has bothered me for some time. Obama, as well as the majority of other liberal politicians are hypocrites when it comes to education.

    Obama is misguided if he thinks he’s going to change the public school system in America by throwing money and legislation at it. It doesn’t work like that. Funding is not the problem. Numerous study have proven this. The problem is that the community and parents devalue education. Most kids aren’t going to perform well in school simply because it’s looked down upon by their immediate environment. And their parents do little to reverse the stigma. Obama is not going to change this by getting bills passed. It can only be changed with a hands on approach, by having his kids in the schools to inspire other kids, by getting to form relationships with teachers and parents on this level. The hand-on approach worked was a community organizer, but he’s too afraid to try it as an education reformer.

    Public schools aren’t good enough for our liberal politician’s kids, still when we want vouchers they vote against them. In this, I see an implicit strategy by liberals to keep the poor, working class and people of color undereducated, which translate into making up the marginal underclass, just so we maintain a dependence on their

    I’m a staunch supporter of Obama, but his actions are hypocritical.

  9. I’m glad you explored this topic because it’s one that has bothered me for some time. Obama, as well as the majority of other liberal politicians are hypocrites when it comes to education.

    Obama is misguided if he thinks he’s going to change the public school system in America by throwing money and legislation at it. It doesn’t work like that. Funding is not the problem. Numerous study have proven this. The problem is that the community and parents devalue education. Most kids aren’t going to perform well in school simply because it’s looked down upon by their immediate environment. And their parents do little to reverse the stigma. Obama is not going to change this by getting bills passed. It can only be changed with a hands on approach, by having his kids in the schools to inspire other kids, by getting to form relationships with teachers and parents on this level. By being an example. The hand-on approach worked was a community organizer, but he’s too afraid to try it as an education reformer.

    Public schools aren’t good enough for our liberal politician’s kids, still when we want vouchers they vote against them. In this, I see an implicit strategy by liberals to keep the poor, working class and people of color undereducated, which translate into us making up the marginal underclass, just so we maintain a dependence on their supposed liberal politics.

    I’m a staunch supporter of Obama, but his actions are hypocritical.

  10. Courtney…”…(African kids are)instilled with something called DESIRE which is also free but damn near untapped in American’s psyche. Our schools stink because there is a culture of minimalism that is bread in students and TEACHERS and those things combined have made public education substandard.”
    ________________________________________________

    If there is anything that IS a part of an American’s psyche it’s definitely DESIRE. Where is the culture of minimalism that you are referring to? It’s certainly not here.

    Anyway, you’re right. We shouldn’t need a voucher system. We shouldn’t. Yet we still need one. For anyone who says that isn’t the answer…you can’t just tell me no without giving me a better idea. Parents rising up sounds good and all, but I don’t see it happening. The people who need to stand up and fight for their child’s education aren’t concerned about it (for various reasons which, would be an entirely different topic).
    ———————————————-
    TROUBLMan
    “The problem is that the community and parents devalue education. Most kids aren’t going to perform well in school simply because it’s looked down upon by their immediate environment. And their parents do little to reverse the stigma.”
    ____________________________________________________
    Word. I agree. Somehow the question as to why the general feeling is that way. Personally I think Aristotle’s quote sums it up “We are the sum total of our experiences.” In other words if the only successful ni@@az you see play ball or are involved in some fashion of entertainment, then you’re naturally going to look at them like..”Shiiit, they didn’t even need school to get to where they got to. So if I wanna get there, then I don’t need it either.” Same line of thought applies if a young boy wants to hustle.

    Bottom line, if you’re from the hood (or you’re comfortable going there)and you made it out to become successful, somehow (How do you do this in a structured, systematic way? Non-profit? Maybe 100 Visionaries subsidy?) you and those like you need to get back there so the kids can see that you don’t have to ball or rap or act to live a middle class or wealthy life.

    I have homeboys, best friends of mine who can’t understand what I do for a living. I gave up trying to explain it to some of them. I know some of the people here can identify as well.

    Oh and TROUBLMan, that’s an interesting conspiracy theory. Word. It might be true. Peace.

  11. “Word. I agree. Somehow the question as to why the general feeling is that way.”

    I meant….Somehow the question as to why the general feeling is that way needs to be answered.

  12. the majority of kids i see lack a desire to achieve in the public education system. they aspire to be ‘be paid’ or fly, but not knowledgeable, degreed or successful in the ‘American dream’ or even ‘Public Education’ type of way. they do not believe that it can be their story in general. unless somebody changes that notion. this is my opinion because i speak and listen to these kids on the daily. i ask them, what do you want to do with your life? what do you like? how do you plan to achieve your goals etc, and generally they don’t have even the first clue. but, usually my questions lead to discussions and kids end up in college or career programs, WHILE they make beats or whatever their passion is.
    the teachers do and teach the bare minimum and the students are in turn infused with the bare mininum. the curriculum’s are the bare minimum, how many PE or ART classes got cut, how many kids want A’s? the teachers aren’t interested in educating ‘these bad kids’. just today, a student told a teacher, “I didn’t know how to do Algebra until now even though my last teacher gave me a B+ because she liked me.” i mean damn. this is the culture of minimalism i’m talking about. in fact, i just got interrupted, a student just asked me to help him get a D out of the class next door. i guess you could call that desire.

  13. I think there would be more of a problem with Obama sending his kids to private schools if he felt nothing was wrong with the public school system. But he’s already been quoted multiple times about the problems with the public school system.

    If the public school system was top notch (like it should be) then he should have no problem with sending his kids there.

    And then the question of what type of education he wants for his children? IF he wants something with lots of computers and technology, or music, or low student to teacher ratio then again he is better off sending his children to private school because that’s not something you’re going to receive in the public school system as it is now

  14. Gmllz and Troublman done formed like Voltron.

    Both of yall complaining ass Negros need to be hosting a reflection retreat in October Lest you be thrown in the “Negros that Like to Complain but don’t take action Group”.

    YES I said it.

    Public schools aren’t good enough for our liberal politician’s kids, still when we want vouchers they vote against them. In this, I see an implicit strategy by liberals to keep the poor, working class and people of color undereducated, which translate into us making up the marginal underclass, just so we maintain a dependence on their supposed liberal politics.
    =====
    Blood. The next time I SEE YOU, we gonna build on Surplus value and the impact that the shift from a Capitalist Production economy to a Capitalist CONSUMER ECONOMY has had on Americans In General and Black People specifically.

    Real spit.

    I know you LOVES YA Black Muslim, Boot Strap, capitalism and Ya Dough Talk but real spit, you are certainly lobbing a worhty critique with your statement about a mandatory, half literate underclass.

    That ain’t a conspiracy theory.

    Think about it.

    If most Americans work and earn a wage,
    and are taxed at 28%.
    And a small, but powerful number own property and The companies we work for, and both are taxed
    at 15%( or 0 depending on how savvy they are) how are the wage earners
    suppose to get ahead?

    They don’t.

    They simply earn enough money to work,
    eat, pay rent, get up and do it again.

    Perhaps the first 100 Visionary goal is to get National Prop 36 and to get legislation to have all Schools in One state receive equal local/national/federal funding. How in the hell we would go about that, god only knows. But it’s worth asking the question.

    Education IS the new/old/new civil right.

  15. Courtney, I understand what you mean now.

    M Dot
    I don’t know what you mean that we formed like Voltron B. I’m saying yo, you can get more funding but there is still some underlying problems that can’t just be fixed by having more money for better educational materials.

  16. man, i’m torn..

    i’m a South Sider (yeah, i live in NYC now, but my home is Chicago).. my pops lives around the corner from Barack.. i’m biased.. i’m a product of those bad schools, but made it out to go to NU.. whateva..

    i’m sending my kids to the best place possible.. point blank.. it’s my responsibility as a parent first.. my activism will come as well, but not at the expense of my child(ren).. i don’t think that’s making me a flip-flop dude, that’s making me a father.. a father that wants and expects the best for my child(ren).. the public school system is bad on so many levels.. and i’m saying this as a certified secondary math teacher (i’m not a teacher, tho).. i did the Teach for America thing (then i declined after seeing how bad these schools were, and how political TFA was) and that exposed me to a lot of issues in the public school system.. i also have a supplemental education non-profit, so i’m hoping that those things (along with the things Barack does as a “Community Organizer”) allow us the leeway to do things like send our kids to the best spot..

    Barack is doing what he should.. what a parent should.. New Trier is right outside of NU, so i saw the inequalities of their school system.. i also know how much taxes are paid by their wealthy families to go to their schools.. i’ve noticed that parents will spend more to enhance their schools.. the parents paid for those schools and those programs.. now i’m not saying that it’s right or wrong, i’m just stating some of the facts that i know surrounding New Trier..

    in my next breath, i realize that the gov’t should find a way to increase money to the schools w/out the deep pockets of parents.. i’m not sure how that happens, though.. just like at NU, we give back, because we want to keep NU at that high-level.. i’m not sure what the answer is for public schools, but i look forward to seeing what Barack does when he’s in office and has the chance to make a change..

  17. Aunt Jackie says:

    Private education has been a socioeconomic divide since our country began. I can’t imagine in my wildest dreams that two Ivy League Grads would do anything less than send their children to the best schools that they can. Heck, my parents were working middle class and sent my sister to boarding school, and me and my brother to private religious schools, and NO ONE questioned my parents although my mother worked for Oakland Public Schools at the time.

    My mother dedicated 20 years of her life to helping educate children in her community, however what she chose to do with US the children that she bore was a whole ‘nother story. One doesn’t not negate the other.

    My family has attended Catholic schools in rural Louisiana when they were too poor to purchase shoes to wear to class sometimes. Education is generational and is usually passed down by the Mother, educated Mothers educated children.

    I cannot and will fault a family who does right by their children’s education.

  18. the prisoner's wife says:

    I agree with Aunt Jackie. Like her, my Father was/is an educator in the Los Angeles public school system & has been so for my entire life, but i NEVER attended public schools.

    the schools in my neighborhood just weren't up to par, so my parents scrimped to send us to private schools. i feel as though it has offered me an advantage. and despite all of that…i'm not an elitest, but rather a teacher in one of those same LA public schools.

    this debate is interesting. i flinch, automatically, when i hear people generalizing teachers for "doing the minimum" because i know how tired i am at the end of the day. yes, there are wack teachers, but there are even more of us who actually take this shit seriously.

    i do agree with the commenter who said that there needs to be more than just funding. we need a cultural shift. we NEED parental/familial support. our kids, my kids, come to school broken from what they've seen/experienced and learning about writing essays just isn't at the forefront of their minds that day. it's hard, but we need a holistic solution for educating our kids. our system is based on the model from the 1950s, we need to update, be it through the use of technology or whatever…but we need SOMETHING.

    in the meantime tho..when my kid turns five, he'll be in a private school. as a single working parent, the options for before/after school care & a low student:teacher ratio is what i'm looking for.